COP26: Amplifying the voice of investors

The vital role of stewardship in the last stand against climate change

Watch our COP26 #FurtherFaster conference

Federated Hermes hosted on 4 and 5 November, to address three interlinked emergencies of Climate, Nature and Social Injustice.

“The 1.5°C warming target is not out of the world’s reach, but we are fast running out of time.

“Coal, carbon markets and financing are among the issues upon which we hope to see meaningful progress at COP26. However, we are acutely aware of the power and responsibility that we all have as investors. Engagement and stewardship are primary tools in delivering a positive ‘real world’ contribution to the fight against climate change. As the crisis becomes more urgent and the impact more visible in our everyday lives, our willingness to mobilise our influence as investors will be pivotal to how this global story plays out.”

“The 1.5°C warming target is not out of the world’s reach, but we are fast running out of time.

“Coal, carbon markets and financing are among the issues upon which we hope to see meaningful progress at COP26. However, we are acutely aware of the power and responsibility that we all have as investors. Engagement and stewardship are primary tools in delivering a positive ‘real world’ contribution to the fight against climate change. As the crisis becomes more urgent and the impact more visible in our everyday lives, our willingness to mobilise our influence as investors will be pivotal to how this global story plays out.”
Eoin Murray
Eoin Murray
Head of Investment, International at Federated Hermes
Sunset on the steppe landscape
Eoin Murray
Eoin Murray
Head of Investment, International at Federated Hermes
Mountains landscape around the lake

Key takeaways

  • Science tells us that there is a climate crisis that we must deal with urgently
  • Scientists need to talk science to powerful people who can then make the necessary changes. One of the problems is that business leaders and scientists don’t necessarily speak the same language
  • Positive tipping points have led to some big changes in climate friendly tech adoption. These have included a surge in electric vehicle use in Norway and the elimination of UK coal power stations. Tipping points are hard to plan but policy makers and public sentiment can help tilt trends the right way
  • Get your kelp on: Seaweed could help capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere in a similar way that forests do. They could be the forests of the sea, and seaweed is also a nutritious food
  • A shift to net zero aviation will need a shift in the infrastructure that supports the industry. In other words, it may be a costly change

Key takeaways

  • The investment industry is not set up to deal with the climate crisis. It is too short term focused where the climate solution needs long term focus
  • We are the temporary stewards of our infrastructure assets, some of which will last far longer than we will
  • Many of the UK’s infrastructure assets are owned by the private sector including gas, water and power, utilities, as well as rail and air travel facilities
  • The renationalization of these infrastructure assets won’t be enough to solve the climate crisis
  • Ignoring science is at odds with fiduciary responsibilities of investors and business chiefs

Key takeaways

  • Over 99% of fashion products are either incinerated or end up in landfill
  • Pollutants from fashion manufacturing are leaking into the ocean
  • A circular economy business model could unlock a lot of value for the fashion industry
  • The fashion industry needs better ways to recycle its products
  • The industry needs targets for clothing recycling
  • « Consumer preference and government regulations are big risks for fast fashion, » says Lisa Lange Federated Hermes

Key takeaways

  • Climate models are the result of incomplete data. They are by their very nature less than perfect
  • To better tackle the climate crisis, communities need to be integrated with nature
  • The world needs to embrace sustainability science to reach net zero

Key takeaways

  • Fixed-income investors, more than stock owners have the possibility to steer industry to reach climate goals
  • Corporations refinance their debt every seven years and so need to engage with their lenders frequently
  • Companies that do better on climate change will ultimately have lower borrowing costs
  • We need to be transparent about what compromises are involved in fighting climate change

Key takeaways

  • The move to a net zero world isn’t a zero-sum game
  • We must account for the costs of the communities affected by a move to a climate friendly economy. If we don’t then it won’t work, because some communities will bear a larger burden than others
  • Disasters linked to climate change have killed 150 people per day
  • We can’t deny the link between social justice and climate change
  • Finance can help advance social justice
  • The cost of making the economy greener should not be paid for by regressive taxes. It should be borne by those who can afford it, rather than those least able to bear it

Spotlights from our #FurtherFaster conference

Key takeaways

  • Science tells us that there is a climate crisis that we must deal with urgently
  • Scientists need to talk science to powerful people who can then make the necessary changes. One of the problems is that business leaders and scientists don’t necessarily speak the same language
  • Positive tipping points have led to some big changes in climate friendly tech adoption. These have included a surge in electric vehicle use in Norway and the elimination of UK coal power stations. Tipping points are hard to plan but policy makers and public sentiment can help tilt trends the right way
  • Get your kelp on: Seaweed could help capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere in a similar way that forests do. They could be the forests of the sea, and seaweed is also a nutritious food
  • A shift to net zero aviation will need a shift in the infrastructure that supports the industry. In other words, it may be a costly change

Key takeaways

  • The investment industry is not set up to deal with the climate crisis. It is too short term focused where the climate solution needs long term focus
  • We are the temporary stewards of our infrastructure assets, some of which will last far longer than we will
  • Many of the UK’s infrastructure assets are owned by the private sector including gas, water and power, utilities, as well as rail and air travel facilities
  • The renationalization of these infrastructure assets won’t be enough to solve the climate crisis
  • Ignoring science is at odds with fiduciary responsibilities of investors and business chiefs

Key takeaways

  • Over 99% of fashion products are either incinerated or end up in landfill
  • Pollutants from fashion manufacturing are leaking into the ocean
  • A circular economy business model could unlock a lot of value for the fashion industry
  • The fashion industry needs better ways to recycle its products
  • The industry needs targets for clothing recycling
  • « Consumer preference and government regulations are big risks for fast fashion, » says Lisa Lange Federated Hermes

Key takeaways

  • Climate models are the result of incomplete data. They are by their very nature less than perfect
  • To better tackle the climate crisis, communities need to be integrated with nature
  • The world needs to embrace sustainability science to reach net zero

Key takeaways

  • Fixed-income investors, more than stock owners have the possibility to steer industry to reach climate goals
  • Corporations refinance their debt every seven years and so need to engage with their lenders frequently
  • Companies that do better on climate change will ultimately have lower borrowing costs
  • We need to be transparent about what compromises are involved in fighting climate change

Key takeaways

  • The move to a net zero world isn’t a zero-sum game
  • We must account for the costs of the communities affected by a move to a climate friendly economy. If we don’t then it won’t work, because some communities will bear a larger burden than others
  • Disasters linked to climate change have killed 150 people per day
  • We can’t deny the link between social justice and climate change
  • Finance can help advance social justice
  • The cost of making the economy greener should not be paid for by regressive taxes. It should be borne by those who can afford it, rather than those least able to bear it

Key takeaways

  • Over recent years, business leaders and their companies have come to realise they are a part of society, rather than apart from it. They need to ask themselves whether their companies make the world a better place.
  • The International Sustainability Standards Board is a great leap forward, as it will help hold businesses accountable for their actions. However, we must make sure those standards are appropriate.
  • Benchmarking shows that many companies are not planning for a future of sustainable growth.

Key takeaways

  • The climate crisis is a wake-up call to the world, which faces mass plant and animal species extinction and systemic collapse.
  • The crisis is terrifying, but it does not have to be the legacy we leave. We can act now to save the future.
  • Investors need to think about how their stewardship of capital can be used to make the world a better place.

Key takeaways

  • Your morning cup of coffee is under threat, with 60% of coffee varieties at risk of being wiped out due to biodiversity loss caused by climate change.
  • Our oceans are at risk. Pollution and acidification have been responsible for the loss of 70% of the world’s fish since the Industrial Revolution. By 2050, there is expected to be more plastic in the sea than fish.
  • Pollution is harming the health of ocean organisms, and that threatens everyone’s wellbeing. About 80% of our breathable air comes from the oceans and relies on healthy clean seawater.
  • Ocean acidification is the evil twin of climate change. It is caused by toxic pollution.

Key takeaways

  • Greenwashing alert: $2tn (£1.5tn) of assets labelled as compliant with ESG need to be relabelled because they were not actually in line with ESG goals.

  • Every investment can have an impact because investors can use their influence to get companies to change. Big business knows the power of money, so when the people investing the cash talk, corporate chiefs tend to listen.
  • Fiduciary rules for pensions need tweaking. Pension regulations all but demand that investments get made based on financial returns, not on their social benefits. Keeping the rules as they are only exacerbates the climate crisis because money continues to be funnelled into unsustainable businesses.
  • Shareholders can support the efforts for more social justice through community organising. Such efforts can help reduce pollution, which contributes to about 40,000 early deaths a year in the UK.

Reflecting on COP26

Federated Hermes spokespeople offer their perspectives.

Light bulb in hands
Silvia Dall’Angelo, Senior Economist, international at Federated Hermes

As COP26 approaches its close, the feeling is that it has been a mixed bag. There has been progress in many areas, most notably with respect to deforestation, methane emissions and the involvement of the financial sector. Both the public and private sectors have put forward new commitments, with private initiatives showing dynamism and creativity.

 

While 90% of the global economy has now pledged net zero over the next 30 to 50 years, ambitions still fall short of the Paris’ goals. According to IEA’s estimates, updated government pledges would put the world on a 1.8°C post-industrial warming trajectory, compared to 2.1°C before COP26, but still above the all-important 1.5° C threshold. In addition, the lack of details underpinning commitments suggests there is a risk COP26 was an exercise in climate change diplomacy, masking a deficit of political capital, a sense that was reinforced by the prominent absence of China’s President Xi. In addition, the divide between advanced and developing economies was largely unaddressed, implying an unfair burden for developing countries.

 

A bright spot has been the finance industry stepping up its efforts in the fight to climate change, by committing $130tn of capital to achieve a net zero economy by 2050, under the Glasgow Financial Alliance for Net Zero (GFANZ). The headline number – which probably overstates advances – stole the light from advancement in discussions concerning crucial aspects such as the need for harmonised ESG standards and the role of central banks and regulators. In these respects, the IFRS Foundation announced the establishment of a dedicated International Sustainability Standards Board (ISSB), while the Network for Greening the Financial System (NGFS) committed to exploring new and better ways to integrate climate change (and biodiversity) considerations into monetary policy.

 

At the end of the day, the hope is that what happens in Glasgow does not stay in Glasgow. The conversation needs to continue, broaden and, crucially, yield concrete action. Developments outside and beyond COP26 are the real deal. Going forward, we need more ambition, underpinned by robust and timely implementation – including detailed and actionable plans that can be rigorously monitored against measurable intermediate targets. Also, at the macro level, we need a new framework to assess economic performance that goes beyond GDP and integrates environmental and social standards. This mindset shift is a precondition to ensure we successfully transition to a sustainable world, along the lines of a fair and inclusive process.

Mitch Reznick, Head of Research and Sustainable Fixed Income, international at Federated Hermes

US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen delivered keynote remarks on Finance Day of COP26 in Glasgow on the 3rd of November.  After outlining the economic imperative for the global economy to rapidly decarbonise, she offered up a three-decade price tag:  $100 to $150 trillion, a number as large as the intimidating challenge of the world cutting its net emissions to zero by 2050.  In her address, Yellen admitted that the ability to finance the transition stretches beyond the means of government: “The gap between what governments have and what the world needs is large, and the private sector needs to play a bigger role.” This statement is nothing less than a call for action.

 

While it would be helpful to see governments like the US deliver into their own promises stretching back to COP21, the asset management industry cannot wait.  Our investors do not want us to wait.  And, with 20% of all primary investment grade issuance in Green, Social or Sustainability (GSS) format, and the volume of the GSS bond market now at over $1.7tn—a 50% jump year-on-year according to Natixis—the global bond market is making room for sustainability.  As fixed income managers, we can do much to deliver into the call to action from the Yellen, the UN, and many others.  We can continue to create thematic investment solutions and investment processes that direct capital to companies that earnestly and credibly seek to decarbonise, whilst simultaneously having the potential to deliver superior risk-adjusted returns.  These are well-governed companies with a vision for where governments and regulators are directing the global economy to be over the next three decades: net zero.

Fraser Lundie, Head of Credit, international at Federated Hermes

The Glasgow COP was always seen to be an invaluable opportunity to action on previously agreed visions.  The past fortnight has indeed seen significant progress to galvanise consensus towards common standards and frameworks.  Credit market participants will welcome clarity and consistency in this area, noting the significant pledges agreed on coal phase-out, deforestation, methane and emissions.  Their absence to date has often hampered the sustainable finance movement, by injecting confusion, encouraging indecision and unfortunately, aiding greenwashing. 

 

More than ever, Finance and Asset Management have been at the forefront of discussions which are key to facilitating the onboarding of externalities.  The Glasgow Financial Alliance for Net Zero drives further direction of lending away from coal mines and related power stations.  Energy, Utility and Basic Industry sectors are definitively on watch, but no segment of the market can afford to be passive.  Markets love certainty, and with it, comes the ability to plan in a strategic and long-term manner.  With a plan, companies can borrow the trillions of debt financing required for uses such as the energy transition, carbon capture, and biofuel technology.  And, fixed income asset managers such as ourselves can allocate investment capital to fund this.   

 

COP26 will continue to drive an ever more nuanced marketplace – rewarding companies with a keener eye on climate related risks and opportunities through the lens of governance, strategy and risk management. Companies will increasingly have their decarbonisation strategies analysed with science-based targets (or SBTs), with many signing up via the SBT Initiative.  Holistic financial and sustainability analysis is key to delivering positive outcomes.  This can be aided through active engagement.  As metrics and targets become better understood, so too will the differentiation between corporates, financials and sovereigns, leaving active asset managers with a wealth of opportunity to add value.

Louise Dudley, Portfolio Manager - Global Equities, international at Federated Hermes

We have seen countries and the private sector making positive commitments that go beyond previous ambitions. This provides greater momentum behind the race to zero, but the pathways remain unclear. While there remains a wide range of policy ambitions, this makes it more challenging for global companies and investors. We support further climate policy and regulation. Net zero commitments from companies have been rampant over the last 18 months, but still a minority, even for companies in climate critical sectors. Transition plans are critical for companies and as investors we will be pushing to accelerate the delivery of these, along with robust, meaningful targets to support long term value creation. The successes of the Climate Action 100 initiative support the case for collaborative investor engagement and the additional coalitions including the finance pledge on ending deforestation will accelerate action in this area. The TFND framework will ensure companies are accurately and transparently reporting on the risks with investors.

 

This COP has highlighted greater consumer awareness of climate implications and companies are eager to deliver into these sustainable aims. In particular, within agriculture and the food system we expect to see an increasing number of sustainable investment opportunities. We also view technology companies as key to delivering low carbon digital solutions within the broader economy, working with customers to enable a fast transition to a low carbon economy. While focusing on reducing emissions, we are also interested in the developments of carbon removal technologies. This is an area which requires greater funding and targets.

Gemma Corrigan, Head of Policy and Advocacy, international at Federated Hermes

Achieving our climate goals and delivering on the numerous pledges announced at COP will require massive efforts from all stakeholder to accelerate action.

 

COP26 was successful in placing nature and biodiversity at the heart of the climate agenda. Over 120 countries covering more than 90% of the world’s forests have now endorsed the Glasgow Leaders’ Declaration on Forests & Land Use committing to work collectively to halt and reverse forest loss and land degradation by 2030. This landmark announcement was also championed by over 30 financial institutions, including the international Business of Federated Hermes, representing (US) $8.7 trillion in AuM committed to work towards eliminating agricultural commodity-driven deforestation risks in their investment and lending portfolios by 2025. If fully funded, these commitments could reduce emissions by 3.5 gigatonnes by 2030, more than the 3Gts promised in existing nationally determined contributions (according to the ETC).

 

Collaboration and partnerships will be crucial to achieving a 1.5°C pathway and in supporting the transition to a sustainable agricultural sector and in protecting and restoring forests and other critical and often overlooked marine ecosystems.

 

We believe all these efforts and commitments need to be supported by globally consistent and comparable performance metrics and disclosures, to enhance decision-making, trust, and accountability. We therefore strongly welcome the announcement of the formation of a new International Sustainability Standards Board (ISSB) to develop rigorous and globally accepted standards for sustainability reporting that can be adopted worldwide, so that sustainability related risks and opportunities can be appropriately assessed by investors. Going forward, we hope the ISSB will expand beyond its initial focus on enterprise value to embrace the concept of double materiality and examine how climate risks connect with a wider range of environmental and social factors.

Bruce Duguid, Head of Stewardship, EOS at Federated Hermes

From a historical perspective, COP26 looks set to deliver the most ambitious set of government targets to date, with all commitments capable of being very close to limiting climate change to below 2°C, which is a significant improvement on the approximately 4°C of a decade or so ago. However, national targets are no longer the only element, with approximately a third of all G20 listed companies having net zero targets. Investors have arguably been the foremost progressive business voice in driving forward climate goals and the latest GFANZ commitments indicate a majority of asset managers now committed to net zero investment goals. It is now incumbent on investors to give the mandate to companies to pursue net zero goals with targets aligned to 1.5°C and help bridge the gap between national targets and the required reductions.

 

The various sectoral agreements published on coal, methane, deforestation, automotive and fast fashion will help investors provide a further welcome anchor upon which to engage companies to either sign-up to the statements for the first time or deliver on these over coming years.

Perry Noble, Head of Infrastructure, Federated Hermes Infrastructure

Infrastructure is at the heart of the transition to Net Zero. We, as investment managers representing institutional investors, can contribute as stewards of our existing assets, influencing hundreds of small decisions every day, and by investing in innovative solutions. We are part of Mark Carney’s £130tn and we intend to live up to expectations.

 

At our Further Faster conference and others, we have been impressed by the diversity of expertise within and amongst organisations. We now have engineers, ecologists, chemists, lawyers and the broader finance community talking and listening to each other. Knowledge and ideas are being shared. We are also pleased by the integrated discussion of previously siloed concepts –climate, nature, wellbeing and justice. Discussion amongst private sector participants is increasingly holistic. We strongly believe that brave thought leadership is critical to making progress. Innovative solutions are being developed across sectors at an increasing pace.

 

There is clear consensus that we need to stop talking and act now. We also recognise that action requires collaboration, across all levels within the public, private and third sectors. We need to keep talking to each other, in order to collectively achieve the right outcomes. There is a clear risk that we, as the finance community, remain in a bubble. In particular, at COP26 and outside of it – direct community, employee and wider public engagement is lacking, and is essential if a just transition is to be achieved.

 

Collaboration of course requires trust – which will be underpinned by private sector transparency and disclosure. There is no question in our industry that transparency is important. More interesting is a slowly growing consensus that selective presentation of positive impact and achievements actively erodes trust. As businesses, we have to be brave enough to be transparent about negative impacts, failure and challenges, to increase trust and succeed in the longer term.

 

To date, there has been a clear sense that we can’t wait for policy coherence or global consensus to take aggressive action. More recently, the obvious gap between countries’ long term goals and short term or interim targets, which indicates we are headed for 2.4°C, rather than 1.8°C, is concerning. Infrastructure is policy driven by, and to a great extent policy dependent. We remain more concerned than ever that the UK government isn’t being ambitious enough in the near term. It is failing to send the important policy signals that the economy requires to make the critical long term decisions that will shape future infrastructure provision in a Net Zero world.

 

We are particularly concerned at the scale of the challenge in hard to abate sectors – steel, cement and concrete – and the pace of change. Smart innovative solutions, to capture and remove carbon are desperately needed, but progress is slow. The decarbonisation of industry is a particular challenge for an infrastructure sector currently dependent on these materials.

 

Bigger picture, we are surprised that the idea that perpetual growth is consistent with living within planetary boundaries isn’t challenged more. Reduction in demand and consumption is such a key part of the solution and a key challenge in infrastructure, where demand and growth can often equal revenue. Both mindset and revenue model shifts are required to address this challenge.

 

Finally, we are aware that we represent only part of the financing and funding equation. Where public sector funds are required alongside, or to enable, private sector investment, to assist developing countries or support vulnerable populations, where are those funds coming from? How do we, as the corporate community, contribute to the pot? Fair tax, as part of business’ social contribution – as part of the ‘S’ in ESG – must come into the mainstream conversation.

 

It’s easy to become overwhelmed by the science, technology and the scale of the required global change. It would be easy to forget how much we can do right now. In private infrastructure, we know we can influence governance structures, establish sustainability committees, integrate sustainability into strategy, and push companies to set and disclose clear short and medium term decarbonisation targets. We can influence thousands of decisions day to day across our portfolio and we will continue to do that.

« We are proud to be one of the first to sign the commitment to end deforestation, using active ownership and stewardship to catalyse actions that will eliminate commodity-driven deforestation from our portfolios by 2025. » at COP26 World Leaders Summit
Saker Nusseibeh
Saker Nusseibeh, CBE
CEO, International at Federated Hermes
Saker cop26 photo v1
NEWS Federated Hermes (International) is proud to have become a member of the Natural Capital Investment Alliance, as part of HRH The Prince of Wales’ The Sustainable Markets Initiative.

The NCIA aims to accelerate the development of Natural Capital as a mainstream investment theme and to engage the global USD 120 trillion investment management industry to mobilise this private capital efficiently and effectively for Natural Capital opportunities.

Bird's-eye view of the colorful trees
Nachu Chockalingam
Nachu Chockalingam, CFA
Senior Credit Portfolio Manager

Responsible Capitalism survey

Institutional investors believe ESG factors are more important than financial metrics when evaluating a company’s long-term attractiveness.

0 %
of institutional investors believe ESG factors are more important than financial metrics to evaluate long-term attractiveness of a company
0 %
believe investors should avoid companies with ESG failings, even if they could offer attractive short-term returns
0 %
of investors describe investor engagement through stewardship as effective
0 %
of investors believe investor engagement has become more effective over the last three years

Hope vs reality at COP26

The international response to climate change falls into three key pillars.

We assess how much progress is likely to be made at COP26 on the issues that we believe matter most:

Mitigation

How do we avert further climate crises?

No new coal: There is unlikely to be a global agreement to end the initiation of new coal plants

☑ Integrating nature: Biodiversity loss is expected to be fully incorporated into global climate initiatives

⧖ Transportation: We may see a significant number of countries set target dates for when all new cars will be electric

Adaptation

How do we adapt to what we can't change?

✖ Funding resilience: New funding pledges to help communities protect against climate change is unlikely to be enough

☑ Protecting and restoring habitats: We expect to see meaningful commitments made to habitat restoration and protection

☑ Adaptation communication: There is likely to be progress in encouraging countries to summarise how they are adapting to the impact of the changing climate

Finance

How much will it cost to save the world...and who will pay for it?

⧖ Public finance: Wealthy countries have previously pledged $100bn/year to help poorer counties address climate change issues. This target, while critical, is unlikely to be met

⧖ Private finance: Carbon trading will be a spotlight issue in this category. We expect to see strong progress from individual nations, but global consensus is unlikely

Expectations for COP26

Federated Hermes spokespeople offer their perspectives.

Quote

The bar for COP26 to be considered a success is high. More and more countries are committing to reach net zero within the next 30-40 years, but collectively achieving their current climate plans would put the world on a warming trajectory of more than 3°C this century (well off Paris ambitions of 1.5-2°C). Major countries need to step up their pledges and translate their commitments into concrete deeds.

 

Sticking points include China’s role, lack of credible US leadership and the need to finance green development in emerging markets. The discrepancy between Chinese decarbonisation plans and the Paris goals is pronounced. The trajectory for Chinese emissions means China alone would use more than 50% of the remaining Paris-compliant global carbon budget.

 

The US’s on-off attitude hardly suggests it will provide credible leadership in the fight to stop climate change. The US pledge to cut emissions to 50% below 2005 levels by 2030 looks far-fetched. High uncertainty surrounds the fate of the Biden administration’s $3.5bn multi-year ‘Build Back Better’ Bill – including significant provisions for green investments.

 

Advanced economies need to make sure emerging markets have the resources to achieve their development goals within environmental boundaries. So far, they have fallen short of their pledge to provide $100bn a year to emerging markets to support their energy transition. Given the challenges, expectations for concrete action from COP26 are modest but there is ample room for positive surprises.

Silvia Dall’Angelo – Senior Economist, international business of Federated Hermes
Quote

Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) – individual country plans that determine how they will go about limiting warming to 1.5 degrees, or at least well below 2 degrees – are far short of where we need to be. At COP we hope to see countries commit to more ambitious NDCs, supported by detailed plans to reach them. We believe it is crucial Article 6 of the Paris Agreement is watertight, to support the Paris Agreement rather than damage its credibility. This is the Article allowing nations underachieving their targets to use overachievement by other nations to meet the overall goals.

 

In 2020, the number of companies with a net-zero commitment tripled. However data from the Climate Action 100+ benchmark shows that while 52% of 159 of the world’s biggest emitting companies have a net-zero goal, only 20% have short and medium-term targets covering most of their emissions. Only 7% have targets aligned to 1.5°C.

 

Given this worrying outlook and the limited time left, we hope COP26 encourages more businesses to put in place short, medium and long-term targets aligned with 1.5°C. This must be underpinned by a comprehensive strategy, with capital expenditure aligned to the Paris goals and progress disclosures in line with the TCFD recommendations. The final step is for companies to become ‘aligned’ by demonstrating progress against these targets. This should lead to a portfolio of net-zero companies by 2030 or sooner.

 

Escalating engagement is important to ensure companies make changes. These include demonstrable board oversight of climate change, executive remuneration aligned to delivering net-zero goals, no lobbying contrary to the Paris goals, and ensuring a ‘just transition’ for employees and stakeholders. Over time, we want to see increasing revenues aligned with green taxonomies, in line with sustainable finance reporting requirements.

 

We would also like to see expansion of engagement beyond the biggest emitting sectors, to include vital sectors such as food and agriculture, as well as apparel and its supply chain. 

Bruce Duguid – Head of Stewardship, EOS at Federated Hermes

Quote

For sustainable finance’s role in the transition to net zero to be the “greatest commercial opportunity”, as Mark Carney described it, there is a need to galvanise consensus. Credit market participants hope COP26 can bring welcome clarity and consistency in this area. Their absence to date has hampered the sustainable finance movement, by injecting confusion, encouraging indecision, and aiding greenwashing. Attention will focus on efforts to agree common carbon pricing mechanisms and broader endorsement of standards, such as the Task Force on Climate-Related Financial Disclosures framework.

 

This holy grail of transparent, globally-recognised accounting and financial disclosure would facilitate onboarding of externalities – difficult to paint positively for carbon-intensive corporate and sovereign issuers. Energy, Utility and Basic Industry sectors will be on watch, but no segment of the market can afford to be passive.

 

The positive for credit markets is the certainty this holy grail provides. Markets love certainty, and with it comes the ability to plan strategically and long term. With a plan, companies can borrow trillions of debt financing required for the energy transition, carbon capture, and biofuel technology. And fixed income asset managers can allocate investment capital to fund this.

 

We expect COP26 to drive a more nuanced marketplace – rewarding companies with a keener eye on climate-related risks and opportunities through the lens of governance, strategy and risk management. Companies will increasingly have their decarbonisation strategies analysed, with many now signing up to science-based targets. Holistic financial and sustainability analysis is key to delivering positive outcomes, and can be aided through active engagement. As metrics and targets become better understood, so too will differentiation between corporates, financials and sovereigns, leaving active asset managers with a wealth of opportunity to add value.

Fraser Lundie – Head of Credit, international business of Federated Hermes
Quote

Key areas of focus at COP26 include emissions reductions, energy efficiency and renewable energy. This is particularly important for energy-intensive sectors. We expect the ratchet effect on targets in these areas will increase from now until 2030 and beyond. Companies falling behind relative to their sector are at risk of being heavily penalised. We have seen many net zero commitments from both countries and companies, however pathways towards these targets and offsets are crucial to determine robustness. Transition plans are crucial to long-term value, and we expect further climate transition votes at companies due to regulatory and societal pressure.

 

A requirement for TCFD reporting across more sectors and countries would be a significant positive outcome. Board oversight on climate change is necessary for accountability. Setting short-term targets and reporting on progress towards them helps investors measure corporate action on climate change. We expect more markets to integrate carbon pricing and broaden the scope of existing schemes.

 

We expect a reversion to normalised growth rates from 2022 which, alongside increased pressure and resources from COP26, should contribute to broadening green opportunities in less developed sectors, such as battery storage and hydrogen. Technology companies have a crucial role to play as they dominate the market and fuel digitalisation and automation, supporting higher productivity.

 

We welcome any progress which seeks to build on combining regulation and innovative business to accelerate action on climate change, giving investors additional transparency on company actions. We target low-carbon and climate-resilient investments, using emissions data and other data points to inform our decisions. We acknowledge stock-specific attributes often drive climate performance; there are also sectoral bottlenecks on progress.

 

Finally, the greatest success comes from all countries working together to solve challenges.  

Louise Dudley – Portfolio Manager, Global Equities, international business of Federated Hermes
Quote

As a responsible infrastructure investor, representing the interests of UK pension scheme members, we encourage the UK government to use COP26 to make firm directional policy commitments. These should be grounded in considered reflection of the science in areas of new generation energy infrastructure, clean transport, and sustainable cities.

 

There is investor appetite to fund opportunities in emerging energy sectors, such as hydrogen, CCUS and energy storage, as well as more traditional renewable generation.


The challenge is that neither consultations, nor isolated initiatives, have provided the whole economy coherence, direction, transparency, and certainty required to unlock investment, across the broadest possible spectrum of capital.


The scale of change required adapt and mitigate the impact of climate change requires thousands of micro decisions across public and private actors. These can only be made in a joined-up, mutually-consistent manner when direction from the top is clear.


We, and our companies, have muted expectations that hopes of hard spending commitments, more aggressive national emission reduction targets, and global carbon pricing will be met. Putting institutional infrastructure capital to work at pace requires governments to be bolder, act faster, and more confident about technology choices than we’ve seen to date.

Rhiannyd Griffith – Federated Hermes Infrastructure
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We would like to see countries make Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) that are more ambitious, addressing 2025-2030 as well as beyond. These should be underpinned by detailed roadmaps, including specific policies to target consumer and company behaviours. Carbon pricing is one of the most promising market-based mechanisms to lower global emissions. A price of at least $100/tonne is needed to reduce global emissions by 50% with current technologies. Carbon prices remain lower than what is required, at $73.18 and $6.93 per tonne under the European and Chinese Emission Trading Schemes last month.

 

Governments must demonstrate leadership on how they will navigate the transition to a net-zero economy in a socially just manner. A just transition needs greater focus on the promotion and implementation of nature-based solutions, including protecting, restoring and sustainably managing biodiversity and ecosystems. We would like to see funding of developing nations go well beyond the pledge of $100bn per annum, to bring more people out of energy poverty. While nationally determined, NDCs should be seen as a collective responsibility.

 

We want to see central banks and regulators think about resilience of the financial system to climate change, and how they can help support an economy-wide transition. For financial institutions operating in secondary markets, we would like to see effective stewardship with companies and other investees empowering boards to make the necessary difficult capital allocation decisions to achieve net zero.

 

Sometimes, market structures and the incentives of financial institutions do not align with transitioning to a net zero and nature positive economy. We would like clarification on the fiduciary duties of these institutions, as well as greater interventions by policymakers to foster a financial landscape promoting rapid mobilisation of capital to the green economy – accelerating innovation and mass deployment of affordable, clean, and reliable technologies.

Gemma Corrigan – Head of Public Policy, international business of Federated Hermes

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